Category: Newsletter

Method of Application for Incorporation of Trustees (April, 2019)

Method of Application for Incorporation of Trustees (April, 2019)

For nonprofits to be registered with the Corporate Affairs Commission; it is required that they go through the process of application as specified by the commission.

The commission requires that the prescribed application form be manually or electronically (online) filled by organisations intending to register, stating in the form, the name of the proposed corporate body which must contain the words: “Incorporated Trustees of (organisation’s name), aims/objectives of the organisation and names/addresses/occupations of the organisation’s secretary.

To be attached to the completed application form are the following; evidence of approval of name, two passport sized photographs, two printed copies of the organisation’s constitution, duly-signed copies of minutes of the meeting appointing the trustees and authorizing the application, showing the people present and the votes scored, the impression of the proposed common seal if the organisation has one and a payment fee of #37,000 (Incorporation of Trustees – 30,000, Certified True Copy of Constitution- 5,000 and Certified True Copy of Incorporated Form -2,000).

This application form must then be signed and submitted to the commission. The commission may at any time require a declaration in the dailies or any other evidence to verify if the statements and particulars provided by the organisations making the application are true and valid.

Failure to provide true and accurate information for the purpose of incorporating trustees with the Corporate Affairs Commission makes the organisation submitting the application liable to a penalty of one-year imprisonment or a fine as specified by the court.

This publication has been produced with the Commonwealth Foundation and the Nigeria Network of NGOs (NNNGO). However, the contents of this publication do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Commonwealth Foundation or NNNGO.

Grants and Opportunities for Nigerian Nonprofits (April, 2019)

Grants and Opportunities for Nigerian Nonprofits (April, 2019)

Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA) Grant
Deadline: April 20, 2019.

OSIWA seeks proposals aimed at achieving the following specific themes; economic governance and advancement, justice reform and the rule of law, free, quality and independent, media equality and anti-discrimination, democratic practice. See here for details.

OHCHR Seeks Proposals for Minorities Fellowship Programme 2019      
Deadline: April 20, 2019.

The Minorities Fellowship Programme (MFP) is OHCHR’s most comprehensive training programme for human rights and minority rights defenders belonging to national or ethnic, religious and linguistic minorities. See more  here.

TY Danjuma Foundation seeks Applications for Health and Education Projects in Nigeria
Deadline: April 30, 2019.

Civil Society Organisations are invited to submit applications to fund health and education  projects in under-served and hard-to-reach communities across Nigeria. The call focuses on the following key areas: Preventable Blindness Maternal and Child Health Upgrading Teachers’ quality. See more here. 

International Conference on Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, and Violence Across the Lifespan. Washington, DC
Deadline: May 1, 2019.

EVAWI is inviting workshop proposals for their 2020 International Conference. The conference promotes innovative techniques, unique approaches, and promising practices in responding to gender-based violence. See more here. 

Proposals for NGOs Small Grant Opportunity 2019
Began on 1 April 2019, 9:00 AM GMT and ends 3 May 2019, 23:59 GMT.

See more here.

Apply for Commonwealth Digital Challenge 2019 Media Tech Accelerator
Deadline: May 3, 2019.

The Media Tech Accelerator challenge is now open and aims to help young, aspiring and tech-savvy entrepreneurs from the Commonwealth to develop an app, digital idea or tool to improve the work or solve challenges encountered by, journalists, communicators and media organisations within the Commonwealth. See more here.  

Applications Open for Trust Conference Change Makers Programme 2019
Deadline: May 3, 2019.

Trust Conference Changemakers Programme is inviting all applicants working in the areas of modern slavery, women’s rights, economic empowerment, refugee support and other human rights areas. See more here.

Future Leaders Connect

Deadline: May 6, 2019.     

Visit here to connect with a long-term network of emerging leaders from around the globe, who want to change the world through policy making. As a member of Future Leaders Connect, you will travel to the UK for ten days of advanced policy and leadership development programme at leading institutions to discuss big global challenges, in the UK Houses of Parliament, meet inspirational leaders and the Møller Institute, Churchill College, University of Cambridge.

2019 D-Prize Grant to Recognise New Entrepreneurs who Increase Access to Proven Poverty Interventions
Deadline: May 12, 2019.

The world has already invented ways to end poverty, yet the best interventions are not being distributed at mass-scale. Can you design a business or NGO that solves distribution challenges? See more here.

Key Population Community HIV Services Action and Response (KP-CARE 1)
Deadline: May 13, 2019.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID/Nigeria) seeks applications from organisations working on HIV services, action and response in Nigeria. See more here. 

Orange Social Venture Prize Africa & Middle East 2019
Deadline: May 30, 2019.

This contest aims to reward the best innovative and socially responsible projects in Africa and the Middle East. See more here.

Call for Proposal for Climate Chance Summit Africa 2019
Deadline: May 31, 2019.

Applicants are invited to apply for “Climate Chance Summit – Africa 2019” which will take place in Accra from October 16th until October 18th at the International Conference Center in Accra. See more here.

Skål International Sustainable Tourism Awards 2019 are now open
Deadline: May 31, 2019.

Skål International is an Affiliate Member of the UNWTO whose mission is to promote the development of responsible, sustainable and universally accessible tourism. See more here.

This newsletter is supported by Forus. However, the ideas and opinions presented in this document do not necessarily represent those of Forus, NNNGO or any other organisation mentioned.

 

 

Human Rights and Social Justice in Nigeria (March, 2019)

Human Rights and Social Justice in Nigeria (March, 2019)

Fundamental human rights are the “inalienable rights of people”. These are legal entitlements enjoyed by every citizen of a country without fear of violation from government or fellow citizens. In every country, these rights are protected and enshrined in the National constitution- chapter 4 of the 1999 constitution of Nigeria states what are considered as the rights of every Nigerian citizen and how they can be    protected.

However, shreds of evidence show that despite the entrenchment of human rights in the Nigerian constitution, continuous restrictions on some aspects of citizens’ rights continue to undermine the status of human rights in the country. Over time, the civic space has been threatened. There have been cases of human right violations, ranging from the intimidation and harassment of human right defenders, restrictions on the freedom of expression, assembly and association, among   others.

The Sustainable Development Goals address the importance of protecting citizens’ rights. Goal 16 of the SDGs delineates the need to  provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels and the civil society must, in line with    the Istanbul principle of development effectiveness, which emphasizes the need for “respect and promotion of human rights and social   justice; carry out the responsibility of bringing accountability by exposing and following up on human right violations.

Accordingly, CSOs are effective as development actors when they develop and implement strategies, activities and practices that promote individual and collective human rights, including the right to development with dignity, right to decent work, social justice and equity for all people.

CSOs should be at the forefront towards ensuring the protection of these rights and the strengthening of civic space in Nigeria. Although   some measures have been put in place by the government to improve the human rights situations in Nigeria, there is still room for improvement.

This newsletter is supported by Forus. However, the ideas and opinions presented in this document do not necessarily represent those of Forus, NNNGO or any other organisation mentioned.

Filing of Annual Returns (March, 2019)

Filing of Annual Returns (March, 2019)

An annual return refers to profit made on investment, over a period of time. In Nigeria, corporate entities registered with the Corporate Affairs Commission (CAC) under the Companies and Allied Matters Act (CAMA) are mandated to file annual returns with the Commission, on a yearly basis.

Even though nonprofit organisations do not make profit on investments, Section 55 of CITA specifically makes it clear that ALL companies, registered with the CAC must file returns irrespective of tax exemptions conferred on their income. This helps to encourage transparency, accountability and to keep record of all functioning organisations, operating within the country.

Generally, organisations must file annual returns not earlier than 30th June or later than 31st December every year (except the year the organisation was incorporated). However, newly registered organisations begin filing their first annual returns, not later than 18 months after incorporation while older organisations file their annual returns not later than 42 days after their Annual General Meeting.

To file annual returns with the Corporate Affairs Commission, an organisation is expected to visit the CAC website, download and fill out an Incorporated Trustees Annual Returns form (CAC/ IT 4), attach an audited financial statement signed by a chartered accountant and two trustees of the organisation or a statement of affairs, in cases where the organisation is yet to commence operation along with a fee of  #5,000.

Complying with this law will aid the maintenance of good organisational structures as it encourages a culture of record keeping and puts compliant organisations on good standing with the Commission accurate and updated records of said organisations will be accessible to the commission which gives room for transparency and accountability.

Failure to file annual returns within the stipulated period will incur an additional cost of #5,000 for every year of noncompliance, as penalty. Persistent noncompliance to this law could result in eventual de-registration of errant nonprofits as the commission is left to assume that this organisation is non-operational.

Filing annual returns with the Corporate Affairs Commission as and when due helps to keep the organisation’s name on the commission’s register, saves time in situations where a nonprofit needs a post-incorporation service or documents from the commission and also prevents nonprofits from payment of penalties that apply for late filing of annual returns.

This publication has been produced with the support of Commonwealth Foundation and the Nigeria Network of NGOs (NNNGO). However, the contents of this publication do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Commonwealth Foundation or NNNGO.

Incorporation of Trustees (February, 2019)      

Incorporation of Trustees (February, 2019)      

Boards of trustees are pivotal to the growth and success of nonprofits. Their role is to serve as governing bodies, safeguard the core values of an organization and ensure the fulfillment of its vision and supervise the overall operation.

A Board of Trustees is made up of a number of different representatives, often an odd number; between five and thirteen persons or as stipulated in the organisation’s founding document and is often elected or appointed at an Annual General Meeting, for a specific period of time.

Board members can be drawn from all sectors of the community and a founder could form a recruitment panel amongst existing staff or some members of their current board in order to get different views on prospective candidates for a new board so that a more informed decision is taken.

As the governing body of a nonprofit, the board oversees policy approval and is legally accountable to public as well as beneficiaries of the organisation it serves. By law, it is required that the Board meets on a regular schedule to make decisions regarding the organisation, however, the frequency of meetings can be guided by the decisions that the Board needs to make or events, within a timeline, that facilitate management’s ability to effectively implement those decisions.

The Director of a nonprofit sets the agenda to shape the work of the board, therefore he or she is expected to attend Board meeting, however, since every decision the board makes relating to budget and compensation will impact the him or her (in cases where the Director is a paid employee), there may be conflicts of interest.

To handle this, the Director could be excluded from discussions involving budget and compensation, but be allowed to have a vote and remain a part of the board for other business. Alternatively, he or she could be invited to board meetings as a guest rather than a voting member.

This publication has been produced with the Commonwealth Foundation and the Nigeria Network of NGOs (NNNGO). However, the contents of this publication do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Commonwealth Foundation or the Nigeria Network of NGOs.

Part F of CAMA and its Implication for Nigerian Nonprofits (January, 2019)

Part F of CAMA and its Implication for Nigerian Nonprofits (January, 2019)

Corporate entities and nonprofit organizations in Nigeria and beyond have continued to support and engage in charitable causes, which have met the yearnings and aspirations of individuals, groups and the society at large. In carrying out these charitable activities there are regulations nonprofits need to adhere to in order to ensure smooth operations within their organisations.

One of such regulations is the repealed and enacted Part C of Companies Allied Matters Act (CAMA), now referred to as Part F of CAMA, in the newly released amended version by the Senate of the Federal Republic of Nigeria in May 2018; the Companies and Allied Matters Act is a regulatory manual on how NGOs should be established and run. The Part C, now part F, provides for incorporated trustees.

It was the determination of the Nigerian Federal Government to reform the law regulating the affairs of companies and its administration in Nigeria that led to the promulgation of the CAMA and established the Corporate Affairs Commission.

Nonprofit charitable organizations are governed by Board of Directors (sometimes called Trustees); the Part F helps explain processes to incorporating trusteeship, file annual returns, common seal, preservation of accounting records, developing an organisational constitution and other regulations which aids the smooth running of nonprofits.

The implications shown from the new amended Part F is that it seeks to establish an efficient way of registering an organisation with ease, minimizing compliance burden of nonprofits as well as small and medium enterprises (SMEs) to bring Nigeria’s foremost commercial law in line with international best practices.

Further Reading
http://www.mondaq.com/Nigeria/x/753410/Corporate+Commercial+Law/The+Companies+And+Allied+Matters+Bill+2018+Implications+For+Businesses+In+Nigeria

This publication has been produced with the support of the Commonwealth Foundation. The contents of this publication are the sole responsibility of NNNGO and should in no way be taken to reflect the views of the Commonwealth Foundation.