Category: News

NNNGO-PAS Project Director Oyebisi urges improved release of funding for family planning and routine immunization

NNNGO-PAS Project Director Oyebisi urges improved release of funding for family planning and routine immunization

Oyebisi made the statement while delivering a keynote speech at the second Lagos State SDGs Summit with over 200 leading representatives of government, civil society, private sector and the media in Lagos.

Lagos, Nigeria, September 20, 2018/ — NNNGO-PACFAH@Scale Project Director, Oluseyi Oyebisi on Thursday urged governments at the State and Local Government level to seize opportunities for a healthy population by improving on the release of funding for family planning (FP) and routine immunization (RI) in Lagos State. Oyebisi made this statement while delivering a keynote speech at the second Lagos State Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Summit with over 200 leading representatives of government, civil society, private sector and the media in Lagos.

Speaking on the projects findings at the summit which had in attendance the Commissioner for Economic Planning and Budget, Honourable Sunday Olusegun Banjo, Oyebisi said: “from our work we have seen an increase in budget allocations to FP and RI in the 2018 budget and if we have more funds for our primary health care centers (PHC’s) to effectively deliver FP and RI services, we will see an increase to the uptake of family planning in the State”.

“Honourable Commissioner, as I prepare for my presentation at this summit, I reviewed the score card developed by NNNGO-PAS on FP financing at the 41 local government areas of Lagos State. We have seen commitment to family planning in the health budget for the State and I applaud you for that. Here you can see how funds are released to PHC’s and how little these funds are. We see between 3000 and 25,000 Naira given to PHC’s monthly to buy FP consumables albeit irregular.

An improved use of family planning services can help achieve our global goals objectives with results seen in the areas of unintended pregnancies, a cut in maternal and child deaths–giving women more control over their lives and the chance to work.

L-R: Oluseyi Ojurongbe, Oluseyi Oyebisi, Hon. Olusegun Banjo and Dr. Paul Abolo
L-R: Oluseyi Ojurongbe, Oluseyi Oyebisi, Hon. Olusegun Banjo and Dr. Paul Abolo

Honourable Sunday Olusegun Banjo, Commissioner for Economic Planning and Budget, Oluseyi Ojurongbe, Working Team Private Sector Advisory Group on SDGs Nigeria and Mories Atoki. – SM Sustainability, SDGs & Climate Change Pricewaterhousecoopers Inc were among panelists discussing multi-stakeholder approaches to attaining the SDGs at the event.

Addressing participants, Honourable Sunday Olusegun Banjo explained that the Lagos State Government is willing to partner with civil society organisations and the private sector in attaining the SDGs in Lagos State and “stands ready to receive feedback from all stakeholders on how to improve and prioritise development in the State”.

Oyebisi who is leading the Nigeria Network of NGOs /Partnership for Advocacy in Child and Family at Scale, PACFaH@Scale, (PAS) a social accountability project aimed at ensuring improved financial commitment to FP and RI in Lagos State also met with a section of nonprofits at the event to discuss the PAS project.

Civil society groups must speak up against the shrinking civic space in Nigeria after National Assembly invasion

The time has come for the civil society community in Nigeria and world over to speak up against the shrinking civic space in Nigeria, Spaces for Change [S4C] and Nigeria Network of NGOs (NNNGO) said today, after the National Assembly invasion. Heavily–armed security operatives of Nigeria’s Department of State Security Services (DSS) barricaded the entrance of the Nigerian federal parliament on Tuesday, August 7, 2018, preventing federal lawmakers from accessing their offices to carry out their lawful legislative duties.

“The civil society community must strongly resist these undemocratic tendencies. Nigerian authorities must end this trend of shrinking civic space and weakening of democratic institutions in the country”, said Ms. Yemisi Ramsome-Kuti, Nigeria Network of NGOs Trustee.

DSS’ Tuesday invasion of the National Assembly is the height of closing civic space any country could witness in a democracy, said Victoria Ibezim-Ohaeri, Executive Director at Spaces for Change.

Nigeria’s Vice-President ordered the sack of the Director General of the DSS following the intense public outrage that greeted the invasion. While we applaud and welcome the sack of the Director General of the DSS, it must be noted that there are several cases of attacks by the DSS on civil society activists, journalists and human rights defenders in the country. Spaces for Change has has tracked 103 incidents of governmental restrictions on free speech, association, religious and assembly rights that occurred between May 2015 – May 2017. See www.closingspaces.org.

In its March 2018 United Nations Universal Periodic Review Report submitted to the United Nations Human Rights Council, the NNNGO and Civicus are “alarmed by attacks on and intimidation of human right defenders, civil society activists and journalists in Nigeria, predominantly carried out by operatives of the Department of State Security”.

The civil society community cannot continue to look the other way as DSS’ role in the closing of civic space in the country continues.  With the invasion of the National Assembly, Spaces for Change and the NNNGO are concerned the attack and intimidation by the DSS on citizens will continue to grow if not properly checked.

We are very alarmed that a revered institution such as the National Assembly can be invaded by the DSS in a democracy. Spaces for Change and the Nigeria Network of NGOs stand together with the National Assembly in this difficult time and we continue to call for the protection of civic space by all democratic associations, movements and institutions in the country.

The DSS reports directly to the Presidency. Accordingly, President Mohammadu Buhari must make good his commitment to the rule of law by not only ordering all security forces in the country to respect the rights of citizens to freedom of assembly, speech and association, but also by restraining the DSS from continuing its vicious campaign of intimidation and suppression of the rights of citizens under the guise of state security.

The new DSS boss must show true leadership and heed the demands of citizens and citizen organisations to release citizens detained by DSS for exercising their rights to the freedom of peaceful assembly, speech and association and review their cases to prevent continued harassment.

“Nothing can ever wipe out the unimaginable trauma our democracy and civic space witnessed yesterday in the hands of the DSS. The minimum the government of Nigeria can do at this time is to provide restorative measures capable of reassuring the National Assembly and the over 170 million Nigerians who elected them that their rights to freedom of association, speech and assembly is guaranteed.

 

— End—

About Spaces for Change

Established in May 2011, Spaces for Change (S4C) is a research and advocacy organization working to infuse human rights into social and economic decision-making processes in Nigeria. The organization works to increase the participation of Nigerian youth, women and communities in the development of social and economic policy, and also help public authorities and corporate entities to put a human rights approach at the heart of their decision-making. (www.spacesforchange.org)

 

About Nigeria Network of NGOs

The Nigeria Network of NGOs (NNNGO) is the first generic membership body for civil society organizations in Nigeria that facilitates effective advocacy on issues of poverty and other developmental issues. Established in 1992, NNNGO represents over 2,400 organizations ranging from small groups working at the local level, to larger networks working at the national level. Read more at www.nnngo.org.

DOCUMENTS TO BE MADE AVAILABLE BY YOUR ORGANIZATION – NGO

DOCUMENTS TO BE MADE AVAILABLE BY YOUR ORGANIZATION – NGO

Nonprofits across the country have begun to witness a trend of routine inspection by officials of the Special Control Unit against Money Laundering, SCUML and Economic Financial Crimes Commission, EFCC. These visits are part of the mandate of SCUML and EFCC to determine the compliance rate of Nigerian NPOs with the Anti-Money Laundering and Countering the Finance of Terrorism, AML/CFT regime and serve as a way for government to better keep track of the activities of NPOs. Ultimately, they help to ensure that NPOs are not vulnerable to risks of being used as conduits for Money Laundering, ML and Terrorism Financing, TF.

A routine inspection by SCUML is often heralded by an official letter stating the dates and time the visit will occur; along with a list of documents they would like to see during their visit (Below is the list). The Executive Director or whoever is the head of the organisation is expected to be available to receive them.

DOCUMENTS TO BE MADE AVAILABLE BY YOUR ORGANIZATION – NGO

  1. General/Sales transaction ledger (2014 to date)
  2. Statement of accounts for the last 12 months
  3. Organisational chart (Organogram)
  4. AML/CFT related policies/manual for staff training
  5. Summary of litigation by and against your institution, including current status and the potential impact upon conclusion
  6. List of your institution’s affiliated companies/subsidiaries
  7. Breakdown of all grants, donations, contributions and gifts made to your organisation (including material donations) above N1million from 2014 to date
  8. Summary of all completed and ongoing programmes/projects from 2014 to date
  9. List of beneficiaries of your programmes/projects in tune of N160,000 and above from 2014 to date

Note that the team will sight the originals of the documents listed above.

NNNGO ORGANISES UPR ADVOCACY STRATEGY WORKSHOP

NNNGO ORGANISES UPR ADVOCACY STRATEGY WORKSHOP

In 2013, Nigeria accepted 10 recommendations relating to civic space with a view to strengthening the Nigerian civil society.

LAGOS, Nigeria, June 6, 2018–The Nigeria Network of NGOs, NNNGO engaged CSOs in an advocacy strategy to appraise the implementation of past recommendations of the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) and contribute to Nigeria’s submission in the forthcoming review.

The first human rights mechanism to ever achieve 100% participation, twice, by United Nations (UN) member states, the UPR was established in March 2006 by the Human Rights Council (HRC) with the aim of improving current human rights situation in each of the 193 UN member states.

It allows a review of the human rights situation of all UN Member States every 5 years with 42 States undergoing the review each year during three Working Group sessions dedicated to 14 States each.  The result of each review is reflected in the Final Report of the Working Group, which lists the recommendations the State under Review (SuR) will have to implement before the next review.

What makes the UPR especially unique is the inclusion of the civil society such that CSOs are allowed to advocate and take part in implementation of human rights obligations. Thus, a workshop was necessary in order to share outcomes of findings on the 10 recommendations on civic space, the contributions of civil society actors and recommendations as submitted jointly by CIVICUS and NNNGO.

Participants who comprised seventy-one Nonprofits dialogued at the UPR advocacy strategy workshop in view of examining the Nigerian Government’s compliance with its international human rights obligations to create and maintain a safe and enabling environment for civil society.

“Specifically, we analysed the Government of Nigeria’s fulfillment of the rights to freedom of association, peaceful assembly and expression as well as unwarranted restrictions on human rights defenders since its previous UPR examinations in October 2013 and noted gaps in the implementation of these recommendations” noted Ms. Chidinma Okpara, the resident UPR researcher for NNNGO.

In light of providing action-oriented follow-up recommendations, participants at the break-out session during the workshop identified areas of concern, broad goals and specific objectives founded on realities and challenges faced by nonprofit organisations in Nigeria.

According to one of the participants, “one of the challenges we face in the clamour for the implementation of these recommendations is inaccessibility to decision-makers, especially as the submission comes up around the same time as the primary elections.” Another participant also identified challenges of inadequate funding and unavailability of concrete data on human rights situations in the country as obstacles to the actualization of the goals.

However, many participants affirmed that the upcoming 2019 elections may serve as a veritable opportunity that civil society actors could leverage upon to assure that the challenges are mitigated.

Broad goals, targeted at ensuring that the Federal Government of Nigeria implements the 10 recommendations by October 2023 with the ultimate aim of achieving the promotion and protection of fundamental human rights in compliance with the international human rights obligation were aligned with specific objectives.

These objectives were identified as key to the actualization of the goal; such as, creation of public awareness on the 10 recommendations through the media and local community outreaches, strengthening the Nigerian UPR coalition by actively engaging civil society actors in the review process, liaising with the human rights committee at the legislative arm to ensure the amendment of relevant bills and ensuring that CSOs are engaged in the UPR process before the government submits its report.

PLASTIC DOES IT

PLASTIC DOES IT

Sustainable Development Goals 14 and 15 focus on conserving and protecting under water and land ecosystems.  World Environment Day, 5th of June every year drives this action for the protection of our environment, raising awareness on everyday environmental issues from marine pollution to global warming to sustainable consumption and to wildlife.

For many years now, global consumption of plastics have unimaginably increased, more often than not, from land-based sources and as plastic is composed of major toxic pollutants, it has the potential to cause great harm to the environment in the form of air, water and land pollution; with “Beat Plastic Pollution” as the theme for this year’s World Environment Day, the world, gradually, is rising to the occasion of combating plastic pollution and exploring sustainable alternatives.

WHAT IS PLASTIC?

Plastic is material consisting of any of a wide range of synthetic or natural organic materials that are soft and so can be molded into solid objects, which includes resins, resinoids, polymers, cellulose derivatives, casein materials used in place of other materials, as glass, wood, and metals. Sometimes, plastics do not easily breakdown into simple components.

Plastic pollution is the accumulation of plastic products in the environment that adversely afflict wildlife, wildlife habitat or humans.

Although they decompose over a period of time, an average of 100 to 500 years. They however, with their immense pollution kill our planet, choking our oceans and poisoning food and water. Plastic is listed as the number one threat to marine ecosystem.

All over the world, the statistics are ever growing. Tons of plastic debris has been established at a 78% waste, many of the harmful chemicals posing serious health risks to man, land and marines. While plastic constitutes about 85% of all debris floating on the ocean’s surface, ecologists and oceanographers speculates there may be underwater trash in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Its effects on soil fertility and ultimately food supply, an immense woe.

Since the 1950s, an estimated 6.3 billion tonnes of plastic has been produced, of which an estimated 9% has been recycled and another 12% of plastic waste has been incinerated. Scientists estimate that several plastics are thrown away each year to circle the earth four times. Plastic accounts for around 10% of the total waste generated. Annually, approximately 500 billion plastic bags are used worldwide while more than one million bags are used every minute. It is sad to know that about 1 million sea birds and 100,000 marine mammals are killed annually from plastic in oceans.

One million plastic bottles are bought every minute around the world and that number will top half a trillion by 2021, some other statistic reveals.

Mind boggling?

In 2016, a global population of more than seven billion produced over 300 million tonnes of plastic, signifying that even as the human population increases so does the quantity of solid wastes generation. The ultimate sad facts are swirled by currents, the litters accumulating over time at the center of ocean, poisoning oceans and land, injuring marine life, and affecting human health.

With these mind-blowing facts comes WASTE RECYCLING. Waste recycling is not new, particularly in the developed world. But in the developing countries like Nigeria where it is common place to see flooded cities during rainy season due to blocked drainages, gutters and canals arising from the mountains of refuse that litter every part of the country, emphasis must be thus be stressed on plastic products recycling. Plastic recycling includes melting down plastic water, soft drink bottles and then casting them as plastic chairs and tables. Recycling of waste plastics is the process of recovering scrap or waste plastic and reprocessing the material into useful products, sometimes completely different in form from their original state.

THE DAMAGE

Some of the major long-term effects of plastic pollution are; land pollution, air pollution and amongst the most seriously affected are the coastal communities which ultimately calls for increased expenditures for beach cleaning, public health, waste disposal, litter removal and waste management.

Beyond these woes, it’s time to rethink how we use plastics, for by 2050 there could be more plastic in the world’s waters than fishes. Researchers have identified 400 species of animals whose members either ingested plastics or got entangled in it. Year in year out, the plastics that are constantly thrown into the ocean are responsible for killing one million seabirds and 100,000 marine mammals. Did you know that every year, up to 13 million tonnes of plastic leak into our oceans?

Given the character of this major issue, proactive measures need to be taken to give lasting solution to plastic pollution such that our planets become forever protected. No need for plastic discs anymore, the internet has so become more than friendly. Mugs should come in handy anywhere and everywhere. Stakeholders should encourage the reuse and recycling of waste, especially plastic bags, bottles and containers. It’s time for us to do the rethink, let’s have a redesign, let’s improve our waste collection by sorting and reprocessing. The need is urgent, and we must continue to develop and use multiple strategies to have a waste-free environment.

Our planet is beautiful! Let’s save it!!

[INFOGRAPHIC] How NGOs in Nigeria Use Technology

Two hundred and nineteen Nigerian NGOs, nonprofits, and charities participated in the survey for the 2018 Global NGO Technology Report. Their responses are summarized below. The data is meant to provide benchmarks for organizations in Nigeria so that they can gauge whether they are ahead or behind in their use technology.


14 Stats About How NGOs in Nigeria Use Technology

2018 Nigerian Partner: Nigeria Network of NGOs

 71% of NGOs in Nigeria have a website. Of those, 90% are mobile compatible.

 76% use the .ORG domain. 11% use .COM. 3% use .NET. 3% use .NGO. 1% use country codes. 6% use other domains.

★ 38% use WordPress as their Content Management System for their website. 4%use Joomla. 16% use another CMS and 42% don’t know.

52% of NGOs in Nigeria accept online donations on their website. Of those, 78% accept direct debit payments. 51% accept credit card payments. 14% accept PayPal. 3% accept digital wallet payments.

★ 30% utilize an online peer-to-peer fundraising service.

★ 17% participate in #GivingTuesday.

★ 55% of NGOs in Nigeria regularly send email updates and fundraising appeals to supporters and donors. Of those, 48% use an email marketing service. 18% send email via BCC. 4% send email via their CRM. 20% send email through another method and 10% don’t know.

 58% regularly send text messages to supporters and donors. Of those, 42% also utilize a text-to-give service for SMS fundraising.

 86% of NGOs in Nigeria have a Facebook Page and 28% have a Facebook Group. 64% have a Twitter Profile. 51% have a LinkedIn Page and 16% have a LinkedIn Group. 38% have an Instagram Profile. Other social media used are: 31% YouTube, 24% Google+, 5% Pinterest, 2% Vimeo, 1% Flickr, 1% Tumblr, and 1% Reddit.

47% use messaging apps to communicate with supporters and donors. Of those, 86% use WhatsApp. 48% use Facebook Messenger. 3% use Viber. 3% use Viber. 1% use Snapchat. 1% use WeChat.

 85% of NGOs in Nigeria use Microsoft Windows as their operating system on desktop and laptop computers. 9% use Google Chrome OS. 2% use Apple macOS. 1% use Linux OS. 1% use another operating system and 2% don’t know.

70% use Google Android as their operating system on smartphones and tablets. 19% use Windows Phone. 4% use Apple iOS. 1% use another operating system and 6% don’t know.

★ 10% use a Customer Relationship Manager (CRM) software to track donations and manage communications with supporters and donors. Of those, 59% use a cloud-based CRM.

★ 35% use encryption technology to protect data and communications. Of those, 24% to protect the privacy of email communications. 20% to protect organization information. 12% to protect donor information. 12% to protect the privacy of mobile communications.


Source: NGO Technology Report

 

NNNGO Membership Survey Report

NNNGO Membership Survey Report

The annual NNNGO membership survey tracks how well NNNGO is engaging with its members and meeting programme objectives. The Nigeria Network of NGOs (NNNGO) is home to 2,400 nonprofit organisations spread across the 36 States of the Federation and the Federal Capital Territory.

 

It is critical that the Network’s management understands its members satisfaction of services rendered by the organisation and what changes or improvements they would like to see.  In December 2017, the Nigeria Network of NGOs completed a survey of its members across the country. It is designed to indicate the health of the Network’s membership and identify emerging needs of members for planning and retooling of the organisations membership related activities.

 

The NNNGO membership satisfaction survey was taken by 111 organisations across the 6 geo-political zones of the country. We thank the respondents to the survey questions for their role in making the survey and reporting possible.

 

This is not just a report for the shelves, the Network’s management will use this report to make its membership’s voice stronger in its plans and programmes—and in developing and strengthening the organisation as a platform for inspiring, connecting and advocating for the nonprofit sector as an essential contributor to Nigeria’s communities and economy.

 

A copy of the report is available for download here. (1.4MB)

Workshop Materials: Effective Implementation of Anti-Money Laundering and Combating the Financing of Terrorism (AML/CFT) Requirements in the NPO Sector in Nigeria

Workshop Materials: Effective Implementation of Anti-Money Laundering and Combating the Financing of Terrorism (AML/CFT) Requirements in the NPO Sector in Nigeria

With the support of Open Society Initiative for Western Africa (OSIWA), the Nigeria Network of NGOs (NNNGO) in collaboration with the Special Control Unit Against Money Laundering (SCUML), organised two regional workshops in Lagos state and Abuja on 19th and 26th February 2018 respectively.

The workshops with the theme Effective Implementation of Anti-Money Laundering and Combating the Financing of Terrorism (AML/CFT) Requirements in the NPO Sector in Nigeria were one-day events respectively and aimed at sensitizing non-profit organisations on the Nigerian anti-money laundering and combating the financing of terrorism regime.

Participants were taken through the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) and (GIABA) standards on anti-money laundering and counter-terrorism financing (AML/CTF) for nonprofit organizations (NPOs) and the compliance requirements; the sectoral risk assessment process, its objectives and NPOs’ role from the perspective of FAFT standards with comparative practices of other countries as well as the mutual evaluation process by GIABA / FATF in Nigeria and how this may affect NPOs.

Inclusive were tools and strategies for preventing terrorist abuse of the NPO sector followed by discussions on future strategy of NPO engagement in the evaluation process in Nigeria.

Click here to access presentations made by speakers at both events;

Overview of International AML/CFT Standards on NPOs By Ms. Ibinabo Mary Amachree, Head of Information and Data Management, SCUML. (Download)

An Overview of the Anti Money Laundering/Combating the Financing of Terrorism Regime in Nigeria By Mr. George Adebola, Assistant Director, SCUML.(Download)

The Role and Functions of SCUML as it Relates to Non-Profit Organizations (NPOs) Under the AML/CFT Regime By Mr. Mathew Enu. (Download)

Vulnerabilities of the Non-Profit Sector in Nigeria to Money Laundering & Terrorist Financing as Identified in the National Risk Assessment (NRA) & Measures to Prevent Misuse of the Sector for Money Laundering/Terrorist Financing By Mr. Temitope Olubunmi Erinomo. (Download)

FATF/GIABA Mutual Evaluation Process and the Role of the NGOs for the Successful Conduct of the Mutual Evaluation Review (MER) By Abdul Rahman Mustapha, Head of Monitoring and Analysis, NFIU. (Download)

End.

2018 Annual Letter to the Nonprofit Sector

2018 Annual Letter to the Nonprofit Sector

Dear Nonprofit Leader,

2017 was an upsetting year for the sector. Our resilience was tested by the economic recession and our integrity and togetherness, challenged by the obnoxious House Bill 585. In all, we came out stronger and better. Though the battle is not yet over, we are confident that we will get to the finish line.

2018 presents us with the opportunity to reform our sector and to take our place in national development especially in the attainment of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It is also the year we need to introspect and address the transparency and accountability deficits existing in our fold.

While the debate on the NGO bill rages, we heard a lot about our sector; there were valid concerns, misconceptions, blackmail and misinformation. These must in 2018, inform how we respond to the future of our work as a sector. None of these voices should be missed in our efforts to reform the sector for effectiveness and growth.

Our most cherished value as a sector is accountability. Though many nonprofits are self-funded, there still exists a wide gap in our regulatory compliance; we cannot continue our ways of not reporting to our regulators and stakeholders. Record keeping is a challenge which we must all work together to address in the New Year.

Regulators are expected to step up their regulatory compliance mechanisms in the year. We must work with our regulators as a sector to ensure that their actions enable our operational environment. It is pertinent to be reasonable in our approach to issues bothering on the implementation of existing regulatory frameworks and at the same time, propose necessary reforms to these frameworks.

Each organisation must work out its own transparency and accountability mechanism in line with international best practices and norms. This will entail increasing Board engagement and oversight on their operations, enhancing organisational and operational planning, improving financial management systems, accelerating project implementation, establishing regulatory compliance processes and sustaining transparency and accountability procedures. Bigger nonprofits must be willing to mentor medium and small sized nonprofits, being our brother’s keepers will be the watchword in 2018.

For our sector, 2018 is an important year as it is a pre-election period. We must seize the moment to ensure that we have in place a civil society manifesto that is SDGs-based, one that can serve as a framework for citizens’ demand to individuals seeking elective offices in 2019. Issues already captured in the 17 global goals must form a basis for our national and local election debates.

As the 3rd sector continues to mature, our ability to sit at the table with government and the private sector using evidence from our work is becoming a necessity, we must pay attention to lessons from our activities that can aid policy formulation and implementation. Now is the time to stop agonizing and start organizing for the change we want to see.

For us at the Nigeria Network of NGOs, our work this year will be shaped under 4 strategic pillars—Enabling the operational environment for Nigerian nonprofits, sustaining advocacy on the attainment of the SDGs, strengthening sector-wide organisational capacity and improving knowledge on the Nigerian 3rd sector space. I am counting on your support to make this happen.

May 2018 be the sector’s best year yet!

Your colleague,

Oyebisi B. Oluseyi

Executive Director, Nigeria Network of NGOs.